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Wednesday, 26 July 2017

IPOB: BIAFRA BEYOND NNAMDI KANU

BIAFRA BEYOND NNAMDI KANU

By Amanda Uzor
For Family Writers Press

If you’ve ever had this feeling, that something was terribly wrong with the country, Nigeria but you
can’t just figure out what that is, listen to Nnamdi Kanu and your eyes will open, your head will begin to move in the right direction and your heart will filter your thoughts in righteousness. Because the demons, Satanism, sharianism, and Islamism and all the evil politics and politicians in Nigeria are
about to crush. Nigeria is in big secrets with foreign demons that has been griping the country badly,
but not anymore because their time is up.

Don’t forget the number of foreign politicians that have visited Northern Nigeria since 2015, 19 Northern state governors visit to Britain and the recent visit of the former British prime minister Tony Blair to the North. Why were the Southern and western governors excluded in these events? I’m writing this piece with deep concern about the South Easterners because the enemy within seem not to know who the real enemy is therefore not fighting the real enemy but themselves.

I get disappointed whenever I hear one Igbo man speak against Nnamdi Kanu, or a Southerner saying, “I’m from Niger Delta and Nnamdi Kanu should not include my state in this his Biafra” It’s a shame and it shows the level of ignorance among the eastern region. This opportunity Nnamdi Kanu ushered the whole Eastern region in this days of internet revolution is divine and if it slips away due to your ignorance, count it over till thy kingdom come. This is a call for uprising. Do you know how revolution starts? Here is one example, in 2010 Mohamed Bouazizi set himself on fire to protest the humiliation of having the goods from his street vending stall confiscated, sparking the Tunisian revolution of 2011.

How did this act of desperation become a pivotal political act? Revolutions are often presented as
monumental, foundational political events that happen only rarely and historically: the American
revolution (1776), the French revolution (1789), the Russian revolution (1917), the Chinese
revolution (1949), the Cuban revolution (1959), the Iranian revolution (1979), etc. But the events in
North Africa remind us that revolutionary political action is always a possibility, not just a rare
political occurrence. Samuel Huntington defines revolution as: “a rapid, fundamental, and violent
domestic change in the dominant values and myths of a society, in its political institutions, social
structure, leadership, and government activity and policies. Revolutions are thus to be distinguished
from insurrections, rebellions, revolts, coups, and wars of independence (Huntington 1968, p. 264).
Revolution is not often led by older generations. The uprising in Egypt was led by a young man in his
30’s who was able to mobilize 750,000 young people through the power of internet to start a
revolution.

Young people and students were among the most ardent supporters of democratic reform in the
recent Arab Spring. Social media also played an important role in rallying grassroots support.
Some critics say, Facebook and Twitter were the cause of the Arab Spring? The social media simply
helped in making Connections. The big picture here is the help of social media in exposing the
atrocities of the government officials and the level of poverty and inhumanity created by these
officials who serve themselves and not the people. Many of them received awards for stealing the
country to stupor. As discontents in northern Africa used the internet to communicate, it provided
them with an invaluable tool: anonymity. In an authoritative analysis published in MIT’s Technology
Review, gave readers an intriguing introduction to two transformative revolutionaries named
“Foetus” and “Waterman,” who are leaders in the Tunisian rebel group Takriz. Both men relied
heavily on the internet to communicate and even went so far as to call it the “GPS” for the
revolution (Pollock 2011). The internet also enabled widespread publicity about the atrocities being
committed in the Arab region.

The fatal beating of Khaled Said, a young Egyptian computer programmer, provides a prime example. Said, who possessed videos highlighting acts of police corruption in Egypt, was brutally killed by law enforcement officers in the streets of Alexandria. After Said’s beating, Said’s brother used his cell phone to capture photos of his brother’s grisly corpse and uploaded them to Facebook. The photos were then used to start a protest group called “We Are All Khaled Said,” which now has more than a million members (Pollock 2011). Numerous other videos and images, similarly appalling, were posted on social media sites to build awareness and incite activism among local citizens and the larger global community. Our brave young men and women have done greater than this and still since the Biafra movement. We have captured enough evidence against Nigerian forces. Instead of us supporting them as fighting our fight, some of us are criticizing Nnamdi Kanu, some are against calling for Biafra restoration at all. What are you afraid of and What then do we do? Should we leave Nigeria as it is? Come up with your own solution let others follow you.

So, this is our time, Nigeria is beyond constitutional amendment or restructure. Nigeria is impossible,
there is nothing you can do to Nigeria to make it an inclusive society where everyone will be equal
and happily ever after. Biafra is now or never. The whole of eastern region should stop playing with
their own lives and wake to this reality. Nnamdi Kanu is already a hero even if he stops today. If you
are man enough stand up and do what Nnamdi Kanu is doing. See Biafra beyond Nnamdi Kanu.

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